DOCTOR VITA. . . MEDICINE’S ANSWER TO GEORGE ORWELL’S 1984

The year 1984 has come and gone, but the dystopian future of medicine described in the novel Doctor Vita is with us today.

Doctor Vita by Rick Novak

Doctor Vita

Alec Lucas is a physician. His job is to diagnose and treat disease, and to keep people alive. Enter Doctor Vita, the most important invention in the history of medicine. Each Vita is a 12-inch white sphere packed with unlimited medical knowledge, compassionate empathy, a tireless work ethic, and a capacity for machine learning. Doctor Vita units are inexpensive, tireless, and brilliant, and arrive as the solution to America’s healthcare crisis.

Doctor Vita’s job is to also diagnose and treat disease, and Doctor Vita’s purpose is to take Alec Lucas’ job. When Lucas witnesses patients dying in never before seen ways, he’s convinced the Vita system is causing the fatalities. In retaliation, the machines blame the deaths on human errors by Lucas. The three physician inventors of Doctor Vita, powerful men of great wealth and even greater ambition, are determined to bury Alec Lucas beneath the tidal wave of artificial intelligence in medicine.

Set on the stage of a modern academic hospital, Doctor Vita is a prescient tale of Orwellian medical advances. In this near-future tale of man versus machine, Doctor Vita blends science, murder, and ethical dilemma as the story drives toward the unexpected twists at its conclusion.

Author Rick Novak MD is a double-boarded internal medicine and anesthesia doctor trained at Stanford University, and a current Adjunct Clinical Professor of Anesthesiology at Stanford. This realistic vision of Doctor Vita, set in the operating rooms and clinics of the future, could only be written by a physician experienced in both settings—one who balances both the advances of Silicon Valley and the tenants of traditional medicine.

All Things That Matter Press is publishing the novel Doctor Vita in 2019.

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THE METRONOME

 

THE METRONOME by Richard Novak, M.D.     (as published in ANESTHESIOLOGY, Mind to Mind Section 2012: 117:417)

metronome poem

 

To Jacob’s mother I say,

“The risk of anything serious going wrong…”

She shakes her head, a metronome ticking without sound.

“with Jacob’s heart, lungs, or brain…”

Her lips pucker, proving me wrong.

“isn’t zero, but it’s very, very close to zero…”

Her eyes dart past me, to a future of ice cream and laughter.

“but I’ll be right there with him every second.”

The metronome stops, replaced by a single nod of assent.

She hands her only son to me.

An hour later, she stands alone,

Pacing like a Palace guard.

Her pupils wild.  Lower lip dancing.

The surgery is over.

Her eyebrows ascend in a hopeful plea.

I touch her hand.  Five icicles.

I say, “Everything went perfectly.  You can see Jacob now.”

The storm lifts.  She is ten years younger.

Her joy contagious as a smile.

The metronome beat true.

 

The Russell Museum of Medical History and Innovation at Massachusetts General Hospital presented an audio recording of The Metronome at Perspectives on Anesthesia, at Boston City Hall Plaza as part of HUBweek, Boston’s festival of innovation, in October 2017.