Introducing DOCTOR VITA, by Rick Novak MD

Rick Novak’s second novel Doctor Vita is due in 2019 from All Things That Matter Press.

Silicon Valley transforms American medicine with the invention of Doctor Vita, the world’s first artificial intelligence physician module. Medical care is streamlined, automated, consistent, and costs are controlled. Enter Dr. Alec Lucas, a young computer scientist and physician who perceives serious flaws in the FutureCare System. Patients are dying. When Lucas makes his concerns public, he’s persecuted as an unsafe outlier of antiquated and flawed human medical care. The FutureCare System attacks his quixotic bid to halt the revolution in medical technology, and Lucas strives to solve the dystopian horrors behind Doctor Vita.

Why is artificial intelligence in medicine (AIM) gone awry relevant? Because it can happen to you, in the near future.

Rick Novak MD is board-certified in internal medicine and anesthesiology, and is an Adjunct Clinical Professor in the Stanford University Department of Anesthesiology, Perioperative and Pain Medicine. His experience in operating rooms, clinic settings, ICUs and emergency rooms give him unique and broad insight into what the near future of artificial intelligence in clinical medicine can and must look like.

The future of medicine begins in 2019 . . .

14 thoughts on “Introducing DOCTOR VITA, by Rick Novak MD

  1. Hey Dr. Novak, I’m hoping you didn’t use inappropriate punctuation (apostrophe) in your novel like you did in your preface/description of your superb medical thriller.
    Sincerely,
    Dino Kattato, one of many CRNAs (not CRNA’s).

  2. Rick – Congratulations on the book! I’d love to get a signed copy of your book to give to my Mom, Margaret Hope. Let me know how I can buy one and arrange for that. She’s in an assisted living home now. Our parents were good friends growing up in Hibbing. I actually spent a lot of quality time on your living room floor as our Moms talked away the afternoon – when they weren’t reading books. My parents instilled the book bug in all of their children.

  3. Dear Dr. Novak,
    I read your book yesterday. What a fun read! I also grew up in Hibbing. I loved that you included familiar last names! (Barratto, Perpich, ) Looking forward to your next book!

  4. Rick

    Enjoyed your book! I remember you from high school (you were a couple years younger). I have been “Edward Martinovich’s” law partner for the past 40 years here in Hibbing. Good job!

  5. Dear Dr. Novak, I liked your book very much. Did you know on Dec. 10 there will be an official celebration and fund-raiser at the Androy Hotel to honor Bob Dylan. The funds will be raised for a bronze statue of Hibbing’s Nobel Prize winner and poet. The statue will be sited at Hibbing High School.
    Thanks again for the great read of “The Doctor and Mr. Dylan.”

  6. I stumbled on to your book while searching for the ASA’s policy, if any, on the maximum number of CRNAs that a physician may work with concurrently. I did not find a clear answer. It depends upon whether the physician is “supervising” or “medically directing” by CMS rules. But your book is amazing. I am also an anesthesiologist who was born in 1954, and grew up in a town much smaller than Hibbing (Bellevue, Iowa, population around 2000) and I had lots of Norwegian ancestors in Minnesota and Iowa. I could not put your book down. You have an incredible talent and I am waiting for another book from you. However, I cannot imagine that the CRNA community would be at all pleased with your book and I am not going to give it to any of them to read. The CRNAs with whom I work are all outstanding and I have received anesthesia from a number of CRNAs and have been extremely pleased. Anyway, your book vastly exceeded my expectations, and was much more interesting and realistic than other books I have read that were written by physicians. Again, I hope to read more from you.

    1. Robert,
      Thank you for the inspiring compliments!
      As for the CRNA community, I believe the future will always contain CRNAs and I have no problem with that.
      I think if a CRNA actually read The Doctor and Mr. Dylan to its final pages, they’d see Mr. Dylan as a memorable and admirable character.
      Yes I am writing a second novel. I love the process, and I make time between my clinical workload and my parenting.
      It’s so encouraging to hear that a colleague like yourself had a positive experience reading my work.

      Tell your friends, and keep in touch!

      Rick

  7. Rick I was looking into the clarification of ASA classifications and I ran into The Doctor and MrDylan which received my interest immediately. I’m certainly looking forward to reading your book. I will get back with you upon my completion or if I can’t wait due to running into a scene that’s over the top and requires comment.
    Rick,if your time permits, I would like to ask you a personal question and your professional opinion regarding ASA anesthesia and a 91 YO undergoing a hysterectomy.. Thank you.
    Regards,
    Rebecca Shaw RN

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